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By Downers Grove Pediatrics
April 23, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: ADHD  

Could your child’s daydreaming and inattentive behavior be normal or could they have ADHD?ADHD

Does your child seem off in the clouds most of the time? Have your child’s teachers told you that your child has trouble concentrating or is often disruptive in class? If so, then you may be wondering if it’s time to visit our Downers Grove and Bolingbrook, IL, pediatricians. Could your child have ADHD or could their behaviors just be a normal part of growing up?

Could my child have ADHD?

It’s very important to understand that only a qualified children’s doctor in Downers Grove and Bolingbrook will be able to tell you that your child has ADHD; however, there are certain ways to determine whether the behaviors your child is exhibiting are serious or disruptive enough to warrant a proper medical evaluation.

Here are some questions to ask yourself:

Q. Does my child have trouble staying focused (whether on homework, chores, etc.)?

Q. Does my child jump to a new task before finishing an old one?

Q. Does my child often make careless mistakes?

Q. Does my child regularly misplace or lose things like homework, toys, books, etc?

Q. Does my child often seem like they aren’t listening when spoken to?

Q. Does my child often seem disorganized?

Q. Does my child fidget or have trouble sitting still?

Q. Does my child disrupt others or me during conversation?

Q. Does my child seem rambunctious and unable to stop talking?

Q. Does my child often blurt out answers or disrupt the classroom?

If you answered “yes” to the majority of these questions then it may be time to schedule an ADHD evaluation with us. Remember, a lot of these behaviors and habits are a normal part of childhood; however, if this is happening frequently and affecting your child’s academic, social and/or home life then you should schedule an evaluation with a pediatrician.

How is ADHD treated?

Most people assume that doctors are keen to just prescribe medication to handle ADHD but there is more to it than that. Successful ADHD treatment often requires a combination of medication and behavioral therapy along with the full cooperation of family and school to ensure that they are getting the proper and individualized care they need to meet their unique needs.

Medication can be a great way to improve concentration and focus, which in turn can improve their academic performance; however, medication is not a cure all and every child will respond differently to ADHD medications. We will work with you and your little one to determine which medication is right for them.

Of course, therapy in conjunction with medication is the most effective solution for managing ADHD symptoms. Behavioral therapy is a great way to reinforce positive behaviors. By setting and sticking to a specific rewards-and-consequences system we often see a great improvement in children’s day-to-day lives and behaviors.

If you are a parent in Bolingbrook or Downers Grove, IL, whose child is displaying symptoms of ADHD then it’s time to call Downers Grove Pediatrics. We can help you get to the bottom of your child’s symptoms.

By Downers Grove Pediatrics
April 13, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Infant Jaundice  

Infant Baby SleepingJaundice is a common condition in newborns, caused by excess yellow pigment in the blood called bilirubin, which is produced by the normal breakdown of red blood cells. When bilirubin is produced faster than a newborn’s liver can break it down, the baby’s skin and eyes will appear yellow in color.

In most cases, jaundice disappears without treatment and does not harm the baby. However, if the infant’s bilirubin levels get too high, jaundice can pose a risk of brain damage. It is for this reason that the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all infants should be examined for jaundice within a few days of birth.

Is it Jaundice?

When parents leave the hospital with their newborn, they will want to look for signs of jaundice in the days following, as the condition usually appears around the second or third day of life. Most parents will be able to detect jaundice simply by looking at the baby’s skin under natural daylight. If you notice your newborn’s skin or eyes looking yellow, you should contact your pediatrician to see if jaundice is present.

Also, call your pediatrician immediately if your jaundiced newborn’s condition intensifies or spreads. The following symptoms may be warning signs of dangerously high levels of bilirubin that require prompt treatment.

  • Skin appears very yellow
  • Infant becomes hard to wake or fussy
  • Poor feeding
  • Abnormal behavior
  • Feverish

Treating Jaundice

While most infants with jaundice do not require treatment, in more moderate to severe cases treatment will be recommended. Some infants can be treated by phototherapy, a special light treatment that exposes the baby’s skin to get rid of the excess bilirubin. Infants who do not respond to phototherapy or who continue to have rising bilirubin levels may be treated with a blood transfusion.

Always talk to your pediatrician if you have questions about newborn jaundice. 

By Downers Grove Pediatrics
April 02, 2018
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Germs   Prevention  

Germ PreventionKids pick up germs all day, every day. Whether they are sharing toys, playing at day care or sitting in the classroom, whenever children are together, they are at risk for spreading infectious diseases.

Parents should play an active role in helping their kids stay healthy by taking extra precaution to minimize germs. Here are a few tips on how.

Tidy Up

Spending just a few extra minutes each day tidying up your household can go a long way to keep your home germ-free and your kids healthy. Disinfect kitchen countertops after cooking a meal, and wipe down bathroom surfaces as well—especially if your child has been ill with vomiting or diarrhea. Doorknobs, handrails and many plastic toys should also be sanitized on a routine basis. Simply by disinfecting your home more regularly, and even more so when someone in your household has been ill, you can significantly cut down on re-infection.

Set a Good Example

Parents should set good examples for their children by practicing good hand washing and hygiene at home. Encourage your kids to cough or sneeze into a tissue rather than their hands. Children should also be taught not to share drinking cups, eating utensils or toothbrushes. If your school-aged child does become ill, it’s best to keep them home to minimize spreading the illness to other children in the classroom.

Hand Washing

Finally, one of the easiest (and most effective) ways to prevent the spread of infection is by hand washing. At an early age, encourage your child to wash their hands throughout the day, especially:

  • After using the bathroom
  • Before eating
  • After playing outdoors
  • After touching pets
  • After sneezing or coughing
  • If another member of the household is sick

The Centers for Disease control recommends washing hands for at least 10 to 15 seconds to effectively remove germs.

Parents can’t keep their kids germ-free entirely, but you can take extra precautions to help keep your environment clean. It’s also important to help your child understand the importance of good hygiene and thorough hand washing as a vital way to kill germs and prevent illnesses. 

By Downers Grove Pediatrics
March 16, 2018
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Asthma  

Solid Baby FoodGiving your baby his first spoonful of solid foods is an exciting time! Many parents look forward to the day their little one takes their first bite of rice cereal, and in many cases, baby is just as eager! So how do you know if your baby is ready to transition to solids?

Here are a few tips for helping you introduce and successfully navigate feeding your baby solids.

Is my baby ready for solids?

As a general rule, most babies are ready to tackle solids between 4 and 6 months of age.

  • Weight gain. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, babies are typically big enough to consume solids when they reach about 13 pounds—or about the time they double their birth weight.
  • Head control. Your baby must be able to sit up unsupported and have good head and neck control.  
  • Heightened curiosity. It may be time to introduce your baby to solids when they begin to take interest in the foods around them. Opening of the mouth, chewing motions and staring at your plate at the dinner table are all good indicators it’s time to give solid foods a try.

Getting started

To start, give your baby half a spoonful or less of one type of solid food. Generally it doesn’t matter which food is introduced first, but many parents begin with an iron-fortified rice cereal. Once they master one type of food, then you can gradually give them new foods.

Other foods, such as small banana pieces, scrambled eggs and well-done pasta can also be given to the baby as finger foods. This is usually around the time the baby can sit up and bring their hands or other objects to their mouth.

As your baby learns to eat a few different foods, gradually expose them to a wide variety of flavors and textures from all food groups. In addition to continuing breast milk or formula, you can also introduce meats, cereals, fruits and vegetables. It’s important to watch for allergic reactions as new foods are incorporated into your baby’s diet. If you suspect an allergy, stop using that food and contact your pediatrician.

Talk to your pediatrician for recommendations about feeding your baby solid foods. Your pediatrician can answer any questions you have about nutrition, eating habits and changes to expect as your baby embarks on a solid food diet.

By Downers Grove Pediatrics
February 27, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Nutrition  

Healthy Meals for TeensAs children grow into adolescence, their bodies require more nutrients to grow healthy and strong. But as many parents know, for those teens with busy school schedules, sports practices and jobs, managing a healthy, well-balanced meal plan isn’t always at the top of their priority list. In many cases, a teen’s most important meals are eaten in the car or on the bus as they shuffle from one activity to the next.

Parents can play a very important role in influencing their teen to stay active while maintaining a healthy diet. These tips can help:

  • Encourage your teen to not skip meals, especially breakfast. A well-balanced breakfast is essential to keeping your son or daughter nourished throughout the day.
  • Educate your teen about healthy snack choices. Stock your refrigerator and cabinets with healthy foods and snacks, such as nuts, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat milk and lean meats and poultry. Avoid buying sodas and other sugary drinks and foods that are low in nutritional value.
  • Involve your teen in the selection and preparation of foods to teach them to make healthy choices.
  • Teach your teen how to make healthy selections when eating out at restaurants.

How many servings per day your teenager requires will depend on how many calories his or her body needs. This is based on age, sex, size and activity level. You can discuss your teen’s nutritional habits and recommended daily intake with your teen's pediatrician.

Although balancing school, sports and social activities may present challenges to eating healthy, it is possible to guide your teen on a path of nutritional food choices. Educate them now and promote healthy eating at home to help your teen develop a good understanding of proper nutrition into adulthood. The whole family can benefit from improved eating habits starting at home.





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